AdvOL Student Seminars and Defences
Joe Guan, January 23, 2018, 15:30-16:00, ITB 201
Speaker:   Joe Guan

Title:  Geometric Aspects of Combinatorial Optimization
 
AdvOL Optimization Seminars
Antoine Deza, January 23, 2018, 16:30-17:30, ITB 201
Speaker:   Antoine Deza
Department of Computing and Software
McMaster University

Title:  On lattice polytopes, convex matroid optimization, and degree sequences of hypergraphs
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Fields Institute Industrial Optimization Seminar, January 16, 2018
Speakers:   Paul Ayers (McMaster University)
Jeffrey Kelly (Industrial Algorithms)

On the first Tuesday of each month, the Industrial Optimization Seminar is held at the Fields Institute. See the seminar series website for further information.
 
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Alexander Rosa, December 12, 2017, 16:30-17:30, ITB 201
Speaker:   Alexander Rosa
Department of Mathematics & Statistics
McMaster University

Title:  Reaction graphs of combinatorial configurations

The concept of a reaction graph has its origin in mathematical chemistry. A molecular graph represents a constitutional formula of a chemical compound. A reaction graph is used to describe a special kind of a chemical reaction, called rearrangement, which transforms a given compound into an isomorphic compound. A reaction graph is the graph whose vertices are all possible isomorphic states of the compound and whose edges correspond to rearrangements. Instead of chemical compounds, we may consider reaction graphs of various combinatorial configurations where instead of rearrangements we consider certain well-defined small changes. These graphs are usually highly symmetric, and are quite often strongly regular. We present several examples of such reaction graphs.
 
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